New forecast reveals abnormal shift in US temperatures this summer – and the states worst


Millions of Americans should brace for an abnormal shift in weather this summer after record-breaking temperatures struck the nation last year.

The National Oceanic  and Atmospheric Administration has predicted that it’s going to become swelteringly hot in almost every state – some spots have a 70 percent chance of above-average temperatures for the next three months.

States in the western part of the country will be the worst hit, affecting Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and parts of Colorado that will reach an all-time high of 60 to 70 percent above average from July through September.

Scientists are attributing this change to a weather pattern, called La Niña, which causes wind patterns to change that results in some areas becoming warmer than usual in the summer. 

Utah , Arizona , New Mexico and parts of Colorado will reach temperatures of an all-time high of 60 to 70 percent above average from July through September

Utah , Arizona , New Mexico and parts of Colorado will reach temperatures of an all-time high of 60 to 70 percent above average from July through September

This forecast reflects the switch from the El Niño weather pattern which warms the ocean’s surface to La Niña which then cools the surface, causing the overall weather conditions to be drier and warmer.

La Niña usually occur every three to five years, but can occur over a number of consecutive years. 

This summer’s heatwaves is expected to shatter last year’s record that saw temperatures rise to the highest in more than 2,000 years.

Temperatures in states across the Northeast and extending from Idaho to Texas will experience about 50 to 60 percent above average.

Meanwhile, states in the southeast and parts of the Midwest including Oklahoma, Florida, Virginia and Michigan will see temperatures rise by 40 to 50 percent.

The only exemptions to the abnormal weather are North and South Dakota and parts of Minnesota and Iowa, which have an equal chance of being on par with the average temperature for this time of year or having temperatures above or below average. 

‘A common feature in summer during a developing La Niña is a semi-permanent upper-level ridge over the middle of North America,’ DTN, a Minneapolis-based forecasting company reported.

The ridges are referred to as heat domes which trap hot ocean air which causes intense heat waves and record-high temperatures.

This summer’s heatwaves is expected to shatter last year’s record that saw temperatures rise to their highest in more than 2,000 years. Temperatures in states across the Northeast and extending from Idaho to Texas will lean about 50 to 60 percent above average

Global temperatures have been increasing steadily since the early 2000s and is primarily caused by climate change which has increased temperatures in the US by 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit

Global temperatures have been increasing steadily since the early 2000s and is primarily caused by climate change which has increased temperatures in the US by 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit

The CDC reported there are steps you can take to protect yourself from heat-related illnesses including staying hydrated and in air-conditioned areas as much as possible

The CDC reported there are steps you can take to protect yourself from heat-related illnesses including staying hydrated and in air-conditioned areas as much as possible

Climate change may also contributing to the rise in temperature that has been steadily increasing since the early 2000s.

A 2023 study reported that these record heat waves would have been ‘virtually impossible’ … if humans had not warmed the planet by burning fossil fuels.’

Climate change has increased temperatures in North America by 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit since 1850.

Researchers at the Grantham Institute in London and the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Center in The Netherlands warned that if fossil fuel production isn’t immediately reined in, similar heat waves will continue to occur about every two to five years in the US, Axios reported.

These higher-than-average temperatures are raising concerns about public health and heat-related fatalities as well as a higher risk of hurricanes, droughts and wildfires.

A huge concern is that the US electrical power grid is not equipped to handle the skyrocketing electricity demand that comes with high temperatures and humidity as Americans turn to air conditioning to combat the heat.

The power grid was built in the 1960s and 1970s to manage two-thirds of the US’ electricity, but it has not been updated to meet modern electricity needs, making it vulnerable to extreme weather events.

In a worst-case scenario, the power grid could lead to power outages across the country, which could prove deadly, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists.

There are an estimated 1,300 deaths caused by extreme heat in the US each year, but the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that number is likely higher because some may not be directly connected to the hot weather. 

The EPA said the stress from a hot day could cause heat-related deaths by increasing a person’s chance of suffering a heart attack or other respiratory diseases like pneumonia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported there are steps you can take to protect yourself from heat-related illnesses including staying hydrated and in air-conditioned areas as much as possible.

If your home does not have air conditioning, the CDC recommends you go to a public space like a shopping mall or library to cool down.

The agency also suggests using your stove and oven less to keep the temperature cooler in your home, take a cool bath or shower if you get too hot and call your local health department to see if there are heat-relief shelters set up in the area. 



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