Tesla engineer hits back at disgruntled Cybertruck owners over ‘rust-gate’ – after buyers


Tesla Cybertruck engineer has hit back at claims their $100,000 electric trucks began rusting within just days of use.

Wes Morrill, who has worked at Tesla for over 13 years, said images on social media of so-called rust were simply ‘surface contamination’ – or stains.

He also pointed out that the photos – which were widely reported on – showed marks that were no bigger than a ‘pinhead’, suggesting the criticism had been overblown.

The Cybertruck was finally released in December after a tumultuous manufacturing process and comes with a $76,390 price tag for the all-wheel drive and up to $96,390 for its Cyberbeast version. 

The Cybertruck was released in December with a $76,000 up to $96,000 price tag

The Cybertruck was released in December with a $76,000 up to $96,000 price tag

One owner named Will posted photos showing what appears to be rust spots on the Cybertruck, saying he had owned the truck for less than two weeks, but the siding was damaged allegedly after only two days of driving in the rain.

Other Cybertruck owners have complained that their newly purchased vehicles are rusting, with one saying they were warned it would rust when the Tesla Cybertruck was delivered.

Morrill explained that the appearance of rust spots wasn’t actually the vehicles’ metal but was rusted metal particles – otherwise known as ‘rust dust’ – that had collected on the vehicle either from the factory where it was made or when it was transported on the railway.

YouTuber Justin Demaree, who hosts the channel Bearded Tesla Guy, said a Cybertruck owner brought the vehicle to him complaining of rust spots, but he said it was ‘rust dust’ that landed on the vehicle.

Rust dust can come from train tracks where there is the motion of metal grinding against metal or from automotive factories when vehicles go through the final polish process.

Tesla advertises that the Cybertruck does not need major upkeep, saying the vehicle’s ‘ultra-hard stainless-steel exoskeleton helps to reduce dents, damage, and long-term corrosion,’ adding that ‘repairs are simple and quick.’

A Tesla Cybertruck owner posted photos showing rust spots appeared on the vehicle after only 11 days of use

A Tesla Cybertruck owner posted photos showing rust spots appeared on the vehicle after only 11 days of use

Over time, these particles could gather on the vehicle and rust, making it appear as though the vehicle itself has rusted.

Morrill re-posted the video on X, writing: ‘Good myth-busting. Stainless is reactive and free iron that sits on it will rust.’

He continued: ‘It’s surface contamination only and can be cleaned off easily. Bar Keeper’s Friend used here works well, citrisurf77 can also loosen the deposit and simply wipe it off.

‘If anything is stubborn use a blue non-scratch Scotch Brite pad as it won’t leave any marks on the metal.’

Despite Morrill’s assurances that spots aren’t from corrosion, a Cybertruck owner posted on Cybertruck Owners Club, saying when he picked up the vehicle, he was told it could develop rust.

‘The advisor specifically mentioned the Cybertrucks develop orange rust marks in the rain and that required the vehicle to be buffed out,’ he said.

‘I know I heard the story of never take out your Delorean in the rain but I just never read anything about rust and Cybertrucks.’

The Cybertruck is the first vehicle to be made out of stainless steel since the Delorean luxury sports car was released in 1983.

At the time, stainless steel corrosion was one of the major problems Delorean owners encountered depending on how it was stored.

Elon Musk announced the Cybertruck in 2019, telling people it would cost nearly $40,000

Elon Musk announced the Cybertruck in 2019, telling people it would cost nearly $40,000

Tesla advertises that the Cybertruck does not need major upkeep, saying the vehicle’s ‘ultra-hard stainless-steel exoskeleton helps to reduce dents, damage, and long-term corrosion,’ adding that ‘repairs are simple and quick.’

The long-awaited Cybertruck was first announced in 2019, but since CEO Elon Musk launched the futuristic vehicle in December, it has received staunch criticism from buyers for its hefty price tag.

At the 2019 launch event, Musk announced the cost would start at $39,900 up to $77,000 and would have a range of 500 miles, but at the release event, consumers were distraught to learn that the cheapest version, costing $60,990 won’t be released until 2025 and only has a range of 250 miles.

Tesla received additional complaints for including a stipulation in the purchasing contract that says the company can sue the buyer if they resell the Cybertruck within one year of purchase.

‘Tesla may seek injunctive relief to prevent the transfer of title of the Vehicle or demand liquidated damages from you in the amount of $50,000 or the value received as consideration for the sale or transfer, whichever is greater,’ the clause says.

It adds: ‘Tesla may also refuse to sell you any future vehicles.’





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