People who live with robot pet report lower stress – similar to effects of having a real


  • Study found pet robot penguin helped lower stress levels like owning a dog

Robots really could be man’s best friend, a study has found.

People who lived with a pet-like robot for two months had lower levels of stress, similar to the benefits of having a dog.

‘A robot may have an effect similar to that of animal therapy,’ say the researchers in the journal iScience.

They used a robot resembling a small penguin, which has two feet and the same body temperature as humans.

When its stomach is stroked, it slowly closes its eyes and makes a breathing sound. When its nose is pressed, its body shakes and it laughs.

People who lived with a pet-like robot for two months had lower levels of stress, similar to the benefits of having a dog (file photo of robot dog toy)

 People who lived with a pet-like robot for two months had lower levels of stress, similar to the benefits of having a dog (file photo of robot dog toy)

It tracks the owner with a camera and moves its hand to ask for a hug. It can also make eye contact and communicates in seal-like sounds.

The researchers from Jichi medical university in Japan found that levels of oxytocin, the ‘cuddle hormone’, were 2.2 times higher in robot owners.

Also, levels of cortisol, a hormone marker of increased stress, were twice as high in non-robot owners.

Just 15 minutes with a robot cut the cortisol level in owners and in non-owners.

The study said using social robots could be an alternative to animal-assisted therapy in treatment for depression and alcoholism because of the risk of infection and allergies.

'A robot may have an effect similar to that of animal therapy' say the researchers in the journal iScience (stock photo)

‘A robot may have an effect similar to that of animal therapy’ say the researchers in the journal iScience (stock photo)



Read More

Leave a comment

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More