Apple Watch saved life of Delaware woman who suffered from carbon monoxide poisoning in


A Delaware woman is alive after suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning thanks to the SOS feature on her Apple Watch.

Natalie Nasatka was at home on December 29 when she started to feel dizzy, and her vision became blurry –  but a quick reaction likely saved her life.

That morning, she woke up at 8 a.m. and when she started feeling tired she canceled her appointments and fell asleep on the couch.

When she woke up at noon, her symptoms had increased and she felt weak, dizzy, short of breath and her vision was going in and out.

She dragged herself to bed and felt like she was losing consciousness and said she guessed it was carbon monoxide poisoning because of the symptoms. 

She reached for the side button on her Apple Watch to contact emergency services right before she lost consciousness.

Natalie Nasatka used her Apple Watch to contact emergency personnel when she became dizzy and weak at her Smyrna, Delaware home

Natalie Nasatka used her Apple Watch to contact emergency personnel when she became dizzy and weak at her Smyrna, Delaware home

Nasatka activated the SOS feature which at first, presents an Emergency Call slider for the user to activate, but after a countdown, the watch automatically dialed 911 and sent a text message with the person’s location to every emergency contact in the phone.

‘My survival instincts kicked in when I was at my weakest,’ Nasatka told Dailymail.com, adding that firefighters and emergency responders rushed to Nasatka’s Smyrna, Delaware home where they found her passed out in her bed.

They pulled her from her bed to the waiting ambulance and revived her with oxygen before taking her to a nearby hospital to be treated for carbon monoxide poisoning – and she was back home with her cat on New Year’s Day.

‘I felt an eerie feeling of quickly falling asleep, and a wave of terror swept over me,’ Nasatka said. 

‘I used the SOS feature on my Apple Watch to connect with 911 dispatch. I told them that it was possibly CO poisoning and that I was too weak to move to get out of the house,’ she said, adding that she lost consciousness immediately after.

Nasatka said she regained consciousness when she heard firefighters rushing into the apartment and started crying and saying ‘I want to live.’

The SOS feature immediately contacts 911 and sends your location to your emergency contacts

The SOS feature immediately contacts 911 and sends your location to your emergency contacts

Her cat, Mary Kate, was hiding in an upstairs room, so first responders opened a window for fresh air and closed the bedroom door.

Nasatka spent nearly 24 hours at Bayhealth Kent Campus hospital and was given a continuous flow of oxygen and a CT Scan to assess for brain damage.

She said the CT scan showed her brain was fine but she still suffers from heart palpitations, heartburn, shortness of breath, insomnia, and lethargy.

Nasatka said she believed the gas leak came from the heater and said she didn’t have a CO detector at the time of the incident.

She said when the firefighters arrived she heard them say the monitor read 80 parts per million in the apartment, and her blood was 33 percent carbon monoxide.

The building maintenance had replaced her heater the month before but Nasatka said she had problems with it the entire month and ‘building maintenance has yet to explain why they did not make sure that it was working properly.’

Natalie Nasatka was treated for carbon monoxide poisoning at a nearby hospital for nearly 24 hours

Natalie Nasatka was treated for carbon monoxide poisoning at a nearby hospital for nearly 24 hours

Carbon monoxide poisoning kills at least 420 people in the U.S. every year and more than 100,000 people are rushed to the emergency room from accidental carbon monoxide poisoning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

These numbers are at their highest in the winter when home heating systems run continuously and if not properly maintained, can produce fumes released by furnaces, kerosene heaters, gas rangers, portable generators, and more.

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headaches, dizziness, nausea, weakness, chest pain, and confusion, but people who have been drinking alcohol can die from CO2 poisoning before they ever encounter symptoms.

Nasatka said she is telling her story so that everyone who reads this gets a Carbon Monoxide detector, along with smoke detectors, and any other simple devices designed to alert us to danger.’

The CDC suggests changing the batteries in your carbon monoxide detector every six months, servicing your heating system, water heater, and any other gas appliances yearly, and not leaving your vehicle running in an enclosed space.



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