Biden sends $250million of weapons to Ukraine in FINAL aid package until Congress can


  • The White House has been warning funds for Ukraine will dry up by year’s end
  • Republicans don’t want to approve more aid without more security for the U.S.-Mexico border
  • Congress went home for holidays with no deal in place for funding 

President Joe Biden announced a $250 million weapons package to Ukraine on Wednesday in what officials said could be a final amount of aid from the U.S. unless Congress approves new funding.

Biden has asked Congress for another $61 billion in aid to Ukraine, but Republicans are refusing to approve the assistance without an agreement with Democrats to tighten security along the U.S.-Mexico border.

The White House has warned that without the additional appropriation U.S. aid for Kyiv will run out by the end of the year.

The package includes air defense munitions, anti-armor munitions, ammunition for high mobility artillery rocket systems, and more than 15 million rounds of small arms ammunition.

President Joe Biden announced a $250 million weapons package to Ukraine

President Joe Biden announced a $250 million weapons package to Ukraine

‘Over the course of this year, the U.S. has provided 34 military aid packages worth over $24 billion… We will always be grateful for all of this support,’ Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskywrote Thursday on X, the platform formerly known as Twitter.

Congress has approved more than $110 billion for Ukraine since Russia‘s invasion in February 2022, but it has not approved any funds since Republicans took control of the House of Representatives in January 2023. 

Earlier this month Senate Republicans blocked an aid package for Kyiv because it included no changes to border security policy. 

Biden has said he is willing to compromise with Republicans but a deal was not reached before Congress left Washington DC for the holiday break. 

Negotations are expected to resume in early January. Congress also faces a January 19th deadline to fund the U.S. government.

The president hosted Zelensky at the White House in early December to highlight the need for more funds. 

‘Without supplemental funding, we’re rapidly coming to an end of our ability to help Ukraine respond to the urgent operational demands that it has,’ Biden said during his meeting with the Ukrainian president. 

Zelensky also met with senators to make his case for more funds. 

The administration has warned it does not have money elsewhere that it can allocate to Ukraine without congressional approval.

‘We are still planning one more aid package to Ukraine later this month. However, when that one’s done … we will have no more replenishment authority available to us, and we’re going to need Congress to act without delay, as we have been saying,’ White House spokesman John Kirby said last week.

Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Garron Garn said that – as of Wednesday’s aid package – the administration had run through the funds the Pentagon uses to replenish U.S. stockpiles after making weapons donations like the one to Ukraine.

‘Now that the replenishment funds have fallen short of drawdown authority, we will rigorously assess the implications and ensure decisions align with broader strategic objectives,’ Garn said in a statement. ‘Without the supplemental funding, there will be a shortfall in replenishing U.S. military stocks, affecting American military readiness.’

Garn said there are also no funds remaining to place new factory orders for Ukraine.

Biden’s request to Congress would give the administration an additional $7 billion in authority to make arms donations. It would also provide $18 billion for replenishing donated U.S. stocks and $12 billion for longer-term arms-manufacturing contracts for Ukraine – all of which are considered a lifeline in Kyiv’s battle against Russian President Vladimir Putin.

His request also includes $14 billion for Israel as it fights Hamas and $14 billion for U.S. border security.

Utility workers rest during repair works at a railway station after Russian shelling on December 27, 2023 in Kherson, Ukraine

Utility workers rest during repair works at a railway station after Russian shelling on December 27, 2023 in Kherson, Ukraine

A view of damages at the site of an overnight drone attack at a cottage village near Odesa

A view of damages at the site of an overnight drone attack at a cottage village near Odesa

The latest aid package comes as the war in Ukraine drags on into its 22nd month. Russia fired almost 50 Shahed drones at targets in Ukraine and shelled a train station in the southern city of Kherson where more than 100 civilians were gathered to catch a train to Kyiv. 

And a day earlier, Ukrainian warplanes damaged a Russian ship moored in the Black Sea off Crimea as soldiers on both sides are struggling to make much progress along the front lines.

Zelensky remains defiant, vowing victory over Russia, but Putin has seized on Ukraine’s difficulties, saying in a year-end news conference that Western aid was ‘coming to an end little by little.’ 



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