‘Accident-prone’ Brit father-of-three, 71, was electrocuted by live wire while trying to


An ‘accident-prone’ father-of-three was electrocuted as he tried to get the ‘perfect photograph’ of the Himalayas while fulfilling a lifelong dream to visit India, an inquest heard. 

Ivan Brown, 71, had clambered onto a low roof as a vantage point for the shot overlooking the mountain range when he attempted to steady himself with an overhead cable, unaware it was live.

He fell backwards, hitting his head, but travelling companion David Linder said he believed his friend died instantly from the electric shock.

Mr Brown’s wife, Jackie, 65, told the inquest he ‘was so accident-prone’ and had once fallen down a ravine while searching for his drone and had to be rescued.

She added she was ‘at least glad he was having a good time’ when he died.

British tourist Ivan Brown has died after 'being electrocuted while taking a photo near a construction site' on holiday in India

British tourist Ivan Brown has died after ‘being electrocuted while taking a photo near a construction site’ on holiday in India

Ivan Brown (right) was travelling through India with friend David Linder when he died in April

Ivan Brown (right) was travelling through India with friend David Linder when he died in April 

Mr Brown had been visiting the Dalhousie town, in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, when he accidentally touched a live wire

Mr Brown had been visiting the Dalhousie town, in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, when he accidentally touched a live wire

Mr Brown fell backwards, hitting his head, but travelling companion David Linder said he believed his friend died instantly from the electric shock

Mr Brown fell backwards, hitting his head, but travelling companion David Linder said he believed his friend died instantly from the electric shock

The retired pub landlord and Mr Linder were six weeks into an eight-week trip to India, fulfilling a lifelong ambition to visit the country.

They had already visited several sites including Delhi and the Taj Mahal when they reached Dalhousie, a hill station at an elevation of 6,460ft above sea level in the state of Himachal Pradesh, on March 31.

Wet weather meant they had poor visibility of the Himalayas but, as they were leaving on April 2, the weather changed and sunlight broke through, so the pair asked their driver to stop in the village of Baikunth Nagar.

Mr Linder told the inquest in Norwich on Tuesday: ‘We were just a couple of septuagenarians backpacking across India to discover the history, culture and geography of a fascinating country – although in reality we were staying in hotels and driving.

‘As we were leaving our hotel, we found the most stunning view and asked our driver to pull over.’

Describing how Mr Brown climbed up for a better view, he added: ‘Ivan was always in pursuit of the perfect photograph and reached up on a cable, not realising it was live.’

A local doctor tried to revive him but Mr Linder – who described the trip as ‘a fantastic time, full of wonder and discovery’ – said: ‘I believe he died instantly.’

A post-mortem examination in the UK found abrasions to Mr Brown’s legs and head.

But Dr Sophia Neda, who performed the examination, said his death was most likely caused by heart arrhythmia induced by an electrical current. 

One of the pubs run by Mr Brown was Norwich's most popular sports bars - The Murderers

One of the pubs run by Mr Brown was Norwich’s most popular sports bars – The Murderers

Norfolk senior coroner Yvonne Blake concluded Mr Brown’s death had been an accident.

Earlier this year, the family were informed Indian police were investigating and were told there had been ‘a few incidents at this place’.

Mr Brown had run several pubs in Norwich, including The Eagle, The Jubilee and The Murderers.

Speaking shortly after his death, Mr Brown’s daughter, Natalie, said: ‘He helped so many people in so many ways. It’s a great loss to the whole of Norwich and as a family we are all distraught and devastated.

‘This should never have happened. He should be coming home to us. We loved him dearly.’

Friend Roy Bassett, who had known him for more than 50 years, added: ‘He was a man of the highest integrity. He always displayed great empathy and he had a fierce determination and ambition… a lovely personality that was warm and friendly.

‘I am extremely grateful for Ivan’s loyal friendship and I will greatly miss him and his cheerful, infectious smile – a smile that brightened people’s lives and helped to forge so many lasting friendships.’



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