Lily Allen and her husband David Harbour step out after her latest West End performance


Lily Allen had plenty to smile about as she was joined by her husband David Harbour after her West End performance on Thursday night.

The singer, 38, appeared in very high spirits as she stopped with fans outside of the Duke Of York Theatre to sign some autographs.

She was joined by her famous husband and Hollywood star David Harbour, who donned an all-black ensemble.

Lily – who is starring in the new West End production of The Pillowman – donned a typically casual look following her gruelling performance.

The Smile singer opted for oversized black trousers and a bloused grey top with long sleeves.

Looking radiant: Lily Allen had plenty to smile about as she was joined by her husband David Harbour after her West End performance on Thursday night

Looking radiant: Lily Allen had plenty to smile about as she was joined by her husband David Harbour after her West End performance on Thursday night

Appearance: She was joined by her famous husband and Stranger Things star David Harbour, who wore an all-black ensemble

Appearance: She was joined by her famous husband and Stranger Things star David Harbour, who wore an all-black ensemble

The hitmaker kept it cosy in a pair of open camel sandals, and carried the essentials in a black large tote bag.

The actress kept her platinum tresses tied in a low bun and sported a brown cap from ELLE.

Meanwhile David, 48, looked low-key in black shirt, jacket and matching trousers.

He teamed the look with also black trainers, and hid behind a black cap.

The Stranger Things star was captured flashing a smile as he made his way out of the building while Lily stopped to chat with some fans.

Lily and the Hollywood star started dating in 2019 and got married in September 2020 in Las Vegas. 

David has become a stepfather to Lily’s daughters Ethel, 11, and Marnie, 10, who she shares with ex-husband Sam Cooper.

He portrays father figure Jim Hopper in Stranger Things and has previously said the role helped prepare him to be a stepfather to Lily’s daughters.

Cosy: The Smile singer, 38, opted for oversized black trousers and a bloused grey top with long sleeves

Cosy: The Smile singer, 38, opted for oversized black trousers and a bloused grey top with long sleeves

Low-key: Meanwhile David, 48, looked low-key in black shirt, jacket and matching trousers

Low-key: Meanwhile David, 48, looked low-key in black shirt, jacket and matching trousers

The family enjoyed a vacation to St Barts together in December.

In July last year, David opened up about his marriage to Lily and gushed about his wife admitting to People: ‘I’m so grateful that I’m not alone anymore, and that I have someone that I can tell everything to and who can tell me everything.

‘We can share this experience of walking through life together.’

He added: ‘I’m always so overcome with gratitude for that, because I’ve been alone for most of my life.’

The Not Fair hitmaker looked radiant after the revival of Martin McDonagh’s play The Pillowman  received tepid reviews after its press night last week.

The singer has taken on the gender-swapped role of Katurian in the play, which follows the fiction writer as she is imprisoned by a totalitarian state.

But despite ditching her typically stylish looks for a more bloodied and bruised appearance, there was a mixed reaction to the revival.

One wrote that they were ‘mildly bored’ watching the show, while others branded the her talents too ‘limited’ for the complex character.

Lily sported a bloodied face as she took a bow at the end of her press night debut after starring opposite Steve Pemberton and Paul Kaye in the play, taking on the role that had been previously played by David Tennant in the 2003 original.

Writing in The Telegraph, Claire Allfree awarded the show three stars, writing: ‘[The] production lacks psychological conviction and a certain atmospheric pungency, while Allen is all at sea amid the play’s daring shifts in tone. 

‘I went expecting to be shaken and sickened. Instead I found myself often mildly bored.’

The Times gave the play two stars, with Clive Davis writing: ‘Is Allen up to the task? It’s true that she didn’t disgrace herself in that immensely popular supernatural thriller, 2:22: A Ghost Story.

‘But here, her limitations are more exposed. There’s precious little variation in her voice and gestures; sometimes she seems almost a spectator at her own ordeal. 

‘It’s Steve Pemberton and Paul Kaye — as the sadistic Tupolski and Ariel respectively – who command your attention.’

However, The Evening Standard’s Nick Curtis awarded the play four stars, writing: ‘Allen, who made an impressive stage-acting debut in Dunster’s ongoing 2:22 A Ghost Story, is compulsively watchable: drawn, intense, angular. 

‘But this show requires a juggling of emotional states she can’t quite muster.’

Meanwhile The Stage awarded the show three stars, with Sam Marlow writing: ‘There’s a pallid blankness about Allen that may be intentional, but makes her difficult to engage with.

‘McDonagh glances at, rather than interrogates, the myth of the tortured artist, as well as the notion of creative immortality, yet in mischievously refusing to commit to a point of view, he repeatedly undercuts his own arguments, with the result that the play feels flimsy and nebulous.’

Writing for Theatre Mania, Alex Wood said: ‘As she did in her West End debut 2:22 A Ghost Story (also directed by Dunster), Allen fares well on stage – sincere, eloquent and never overly maniacal in a role that could easily slip into histrionics in the wrong hands. 

‘She most certainly has better material to work with here than in her freshman stage outing, to the extent that you can trace a quite definite character arc as Katurian moves from bewilderment to assured catharsis.’

After the press night show, Lily appeared to be in jovial spirits as she appeared on stage at the Duke of York Theatre alongside her co-star Steve Pemberton.

Bowing to the crowds, Lily showed off her character’s injuries as blood trickled down her face and stained her jumper, hinting at the tragic ending of the production.

Lily appeared pleased with the debut press night run of The Pillowman as she flashed a huge smile and waved at the crowds while taking a bow.

She was joined on stage by her co-stars Steve, who plays Tupolski, and Matthew Tennyson, who stars as Michal, for the curtain call.

Lily is the first woman to play Katurian, after David Tennant portrayed the leading character in the original Olivier award-winning play.

Speaking about the decision to cast a woman in the role, Lily told The Telegraph: ‘I think it will add an extra layer of horror, because we’re not used to seeing women being beaten up. 

‘It will be shocking, in that sense. I also feel that men don’t necessarily get the same c**p for their artistic output that women do.’

Happy couple: Lily and the Hollywood star started dating in 2019 and got married in September 2020 in Las Vegas, as David has become a stepfather to Lily's daughters Ethel, 11, and Marnie, 10, who she shares with ex-husband Sam Cooper

Happy couple: Lily and the Hollywood star started dating in 2019 and got married in September 2020 in Las Vegas, as David has become a stepfather to Lily’s daughters Ethel, 11, and Marnie, 10, who she shares with ex-husband Sam Cooper

Didn't like it? Lily's debut in the revival of Martin McDonagh's play The Pillowman has received tepid reviews from critics after its opening night at the Duke Of York Theatre

Didn’t like it? Lily’s debut in the revival of Martin McDonagh’s play The Pillowman has received tepid reviews from critics after its opening night at the Duke Of York Theatre

Lily said: 'I think it will add an extra layer of horror, because we're not used to seeing women being beaten up' (pictured last week after her performance debut)

Lily said: ‘I think it will add an extra layer of horror, because we’re not used to seeing women being beaten up’ (pictured last week after her performance debut)

The Pillowman follows Katurian as she is brutally questioned by authorities after a spate of murders bear similarities to her short stories.

The black comedy ‘examines the role of the artist in society and asks what price do we pay for freedom of expression’, according to a synopsis on the play’s website.

Speaking about The Pillowman’s discussions around censorship, Lily said the play raises a lot of questions about freedom of speech and the internet.

The production will run at the Duke of York Theatre until September 2, with its hotly-anticipated opening night on Friday having already sold out. 



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