Nearly two-thirds of Democratic voters would prefer another candidate besides Biden in


Nearly two-thirds of Democratic voters would prefer another candidate besides Biden in 2024

  • Just 26 per cent of Democratic voters think the party should nominate President Biden in 2024
  • His approval rating is just 33 per cent in the new New York Times / Sienna College poll 

A new poll brought more troubling news for President Biden as he prepares for a summer legislative push – with nearly two-thirds of members of his own party saying they prefer someone else at the top of the ticket in 2024.

The New York Times/Siena College poll comes during yet another challenging period for Biden, with continuing concerns about inflation and the economy, and following a Supreme Court ruling that overturned Roe v. Wade and its protections of abortion rights.

A total of 64 per cent of voters said they want someone besides Biden as their party’s nominee. Just 26 per cent think the party should nominate Biden – even though incumbent president’s traditionally have major electoral advantages. 

His overall job approval stands at just 33 per cent in the survey. 

A stunning 64 per cent of Democratic voters prefer someone besides President Joe Biden on top of the ticket in 2024, according to a new poll

A stunning 64 per cent of Democratic voters prefer someone besides President Joe Biden on top of the ticket in 2024, according to a new poll

It comes a day after a lengthy Times examination of Biden’s age. The piece said Biden, 79, was ‘testing the boundaries’ of his age. He would be 86 at the end of a second term.

Biden, who spent the weekend in Rehoboth Beach, put his physical fitness on display, going for a bike ride after he briefly fell off his bicycle on his last trip, saying his foot got caught in a toe strap pedal. 

Biden continues to face pressure from within his own party to show action on inflation and economic concerns. He got a jobs report Friday that was stronger than analysts expected, although it could prompt the Fed to impose another sharp rate hike.

The New York Times / Sienna poll has Biden's approval at just 33 per cent

The New York Times / Sienna poll has Biden’s approval at just 33 per cent

Biden faces pressure on the economy and inflation, as well as a new Supreme Court ruling on abortion

Biden faces pressure on the economy and inflation, as well as a new Supreme Court ruling on abortion

Biden also took criticism within his won party for failing to muster a speedy response to the the Supreme Court’s abortion ruling in the Dobbs case. There was more turmoil over the weekend following a comment by departing communications director Kate Bedingfield, who told the Washington Post in response to pushback: ‘Joe Biden’s goal in responding to Dobbs is not to satisfy some activists who have been consistently out of step with the mainstream of the Democratic Part.’ 

‘It’s to deliver help to women who are in danger and assemble a broad-based coalition to defend a woman’s right to choose now, just as he assembled such a coalition to win during the 2020 campaign, she said.

Biden will seek to highlight an achievement that came with bipartisan support in the Senate when he holds an event for new gun safety legislation – although it came before the Highland Park shooting massacre. 

Biden jets to the Middle East this week, but the trip will feature politically challenging images when he meets Saudi Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman, who the U.S. intelligence committee concluded ordered the killing of Jamal Khashoggi. 

Just 13 per cent of those surveyed said the country was on the right track, a low mark for Times surveys. That follows a Monmouth University poll where 88 per cent said the country was going in the wrong direction.



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