Prince William leads the Welsh Guards as they take part in final rehearsal for Trooping


The Prince of Wales has praised troops for doing a ‘really good job’ during the final rehearsal ahead of Trooping the Colour, ‘despite difficult conditions’, after two soldiers ‘fainted’ in the heat. 

During the practice session, known as the Colonel’s Review, a member of The Band collapsed; a photo showed the soldier lying on the ground with an instrument in hand. Another person was snapped being carried away on a stretcher.

The service at Horse Guards Parade in London – which saw Prince William inspect the Welsh Guards while on horseback – is effectively a final rehearsal for Trooping The Colour, which takes place next Saturday to mark King Charles III’s official birthday.

William, 40, who became Colonel of the Welsh Guards in December 2022, looked incredibly smart in his red military uniform, which he teamed with the traditional bearskin hat, while proudly displaying several medals on his chest.

Taking to Twitter after the service, the Prince of Wales wrote: ‘A big thank you to every solider who took part in the Colonel’s Review this morning in the heat. Difficult conditions but you all did a really good job. Thank you. W.’

With just a week to go until King Charles III's birthday parade, the Welsh Guards are today fine-tuning their routine ahead of Trooping the Colour - and they were led by Prince William (pictured)

With just a week to go until King Charles III’s birthday parade, the Welsh Guards are today fine-tuning their routine ahead of Trooping the Colour – and they were led by Prince William (pictured)

The Prince of Wales, 40, who became Colonel of the Welsh Guards in December 2022, looked incredibly smart in his red military uniform, which he teamed with the traditional bearskin hat

The Prince of Wales, 40, who became Colonel of the Welsh Guards in December 2022, looked incredibly smart in his red military uniform, which he teamed with the traditional bearskin hat

A member of The Band of the Welsh Guards appears to faint during today's ceremony

A member of The Band of the Welsh Guards appears to faint during today’s ceremony

Taking to Twitter after the service, the Prince of Wales wrote: 'A big thank you to every solider who took part in the Colonel’s Review this morning in the heat. Difficult conditions but you all did a really good job. Thank you. W.'

Taking to Twitter after the service, the Prince of Wales wrote: ‘A big thank you to every solider who took part in the Colonel’s Review this morning in the heat. Difficult conditions but you all did a really good job. Thank you. W.’

This year’s event is particularly significant because it is the first since Charles succeeded to the throne last September. But while the British Royal Family usually turn out in force for the occasion, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have not been invited, according to The Daily Mail’s Richard Eden. 

He wrote in his column today: ‘When the Duke and Duchess of Sussex quit royal duties three years ago, Queen Elizabeth said they would “always be much loved members of my family”. 

‘And Buckingham Palace officials were keen to stress that they would continue to be invited to family events. I hear that Prince Harry and Meghan have not, however, been invited to the King’s Birthday Parade next weekend.

‘It will be the first time in Harry’s life that he has not been welcome at the monarch’s official birthday celebrations.’

‘I’m afraid it’s a reflection of the state of relations at the moment,’ a source said.

Harry and Meghan travelled from California for last year’s Trooping the Colour, which became part of the late Queen’s platinum jubilee weekend.

The couple were invited by the late monarch to watch the ceremony with other members of the Royal Family from offices overlooking Horse Guards Parade.

They were not, however, asked to be on the Buckingham Palace balcony for the official flypast later in the day.

A Welsh Guardsman is carried away on a stretcher during today's ceremony in London

A Welsh Guardsman is carried away on a stretcher during today’s ceremony in London

A member of The Band of the Welsh Guards appears to faint during today's ceremony (pictured)

A member of The Band of the Welsh Guards appears to faint during today’s ceremony (pictured)

The ceremony - which saw William inspect the soldiers while on horseback - is effectively a final rehearsal for Trooping The Colour, which takes place next Saturday to mark the King's official birthday

The ceremony – which saw William inspect the soldiers while on horseback – is effectively a final rehearsal for Trooping The Colour, which takes place next Saturday to mark the King’s official birthday

The service at Horse Guards Parade in London - which saw the Prince of Wales, 40, inspect the troops while on horseback - is effectively a final rehearsal for Trooping The Colour, which takes place next Saturday to mark the King's official birthday

The service at Horse Guards Parade in London – which saw the Prince of Wales, 40, inspect the troops while on horseback – is effectively a final rehearsal for Trooping The Colour, which takes place next Saturday to mark the King’s official birthday

William sported his red military uniform, which he teamed with the traditional bearskin hat, while proudly displaying several medals on his chest

William sported his red military uniform, which he teamed with the traditional bearskin hat, while proudly displaying several medals on his chest

William sported his red military uniform, which he teamed with the traditional bearskin hat, while proudly displaying several medals on his chest

The Prince of Wales during the Colonel's Review, for Trooping the Colour, at Horse Guards Parade in London

The Prince of Wales during the Colonel’s Review, for Trooping the Colour, at Horse Guards Parade in London

The official birthday of the Sovereign is marked each year by a military parade and march-past, known as Trooping the Colour. The troops participating in the parade are drawn of fully trained, operational troops from the Household Division.

The monarch’s colour of a battalion of Foot Guards is ‘trooped’ – carried along the ranks – each year before the Sovereign. 

Only one colour can be trooped at a time, and the five Household Regiments – Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards take their turn each year.

The ceremony derives from two old military ceremonies, Trooping the Colour and Mounting The Queen’s Guard.

The origin of the ceremony goes back to the early eighteenth century, and possibly even earlier, when the guards and sentries for the Royal Palaces and other important buildings in the capital were mounted daily on the parade ground by the Horse Guards building.

This year's event is particularly significant because it is the first since Charles succeeded to the throne last September. Pictured, The Prince of Wales during the Colonel's Review

This year’s event is particularly significant because it is the first since Charles succeeded to the throne last September. Pictured, The Prince of Wales during the Colonel’s Review

Welsh Guardsman are seen before Prince William carries out the Colonel's Review at Horse Guards Parade

Welsh Guardsman are seen before Prince William carries out the Colonel’s Review at Horse Guards Parade

The official birthday of the Sovereign is marked each year by a military parade and march-past, known as Trooping the Colour. Pictured, Prince William (centre) during today's event

The official birthday of the Sovereign is marked each year by a military parade and march-past, known as Trooping the Colour. Pictured, Prince William (centre) during today’s event

The troops participating in the parade are drawn of fully trained, operational troops from the Household Division. Pictured, William

The troops participating in the parade are drawn of fully trained, operational troops from the Household Division. Pictured, William

The troops participating in the parade are drawn of fully trained, operational troops from the Household Division. Pictured, William

The ceremony derives from two old military ceremonies, Trooping the Colour and Mounting The Queen's Guard. Pictured, William during today's outing

The ceremony derives from two old military ceremonies, Trooping the Colour and Mounting The Queen’s Guard. Pictured, William during today’s outing

The Prince of Wales during the Colonel's Review, for Trooping the Colour, at Horse Guards Parade in London

The Prince of Wales during the Colonel's Review, for Trooping the Colour, at Horse Guards Parade in London

The Prince of Wales during the Colonel’s Review, for Trooping the Colour, at Horse Guards Parade in London

Tickets for the Trooping the Colour are available to the public, but are chosen by ballot early in the year. Pictured, William inspects the troops

Tickets for the Trooping the Colour are available to the public, but are chosen by ballot early in the year. Pictured, William inspects the troops

A feature of guard mounting was for the colours of the battalion to be carried (or ‘trooped’) slowly down the ranks so that they could be seen and recognised by the soldiers.

After the Trooping ceremony, the Royal Family will make their way back to Buckingham Palace where shortly after, several members will appear on the balcony.

The Royal Family usually travel to Horse Guards Parade in carriages and those members of the Royal Family who’re on parade as Colonels of the regiments of Foot Guards, ride on horses on parade.

Other members of the Royal Family watch the parade from the Horse Guards Parade building from the Duke of Wellington’s old office, overlooking the parade ground.

Tickets for the Trooping the Colour are available to the public, but are chosen by ballot early in the year.

For those who are unsuccessful in their application, securing a spot on The Mall is certainly the next best thing, as the march passes from St James’s down towards Buckingham Palace.

For those who are unsuccessful in their application, securing a spot on The Mall is certainly the next best thing, as the march passes from St James's down towards Buckingham Palace. Pictured, The Prince of Wales during the Colonel's Review

For those who are unsuccessful in their application, securing a spot on The Mall is certainly the next best thing, as the march passes from St James’s down towards Buckingham Palace. Pictured, The Prince of Wales during the Colonel’s Review

After the Trooping ceremony, the Royal Family will make their way back to Buckingham Palace where shortly after, several members will appear on the balcony. Pictured, The Prince of Wales salutes during the Colonel's Review

After the Trooping ceremony, the Royal Family will make their way back to Buckingham Palace where shortly after, several members will appear on the balcony. Pictured, The Prince of Wales salutes during the Colonel’s Review

Other members of the Royal Family watch the parade from the Horse Guards Parade building from the Duke of Wellington¿s old office, overlooking the parade ground. Pictured, William carries out the Colonel's Review at Horse Guards Parade

Other members of the Royal Family watch the parade from the Horse Guards Parade building from the Duke of Wellington¿s old office, overlooking the parade ground. Pictured, William carries out the Colonel's Review at Horse Guards Parade

Other members of the Royal Family watch the parade from the Horse Guards Parade building from the Duke of Wellington’s old office, overlooking the parade ground. Pictured, William carries out the Colonel’s Review at Horse Guards Parade



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