The top 10 destinations where British holidaymakers are most likely to have their


The 10 countries where British holidaymakers are most likely to be victims of theft or robbery have been revealed – and it’s Spain that tops the ranking. 

These findings come from insurance firm True Traveller, which analysed theft and robbery claims Britons made in 2022.

Spain is the No.1 for theft or robbery, accounting for one in ten claims (12.7 per cent). In second place is Mexico (10.3 per cent) and Colombia comes third (8.8 per cent).

Peru ranks in fourth place, where 8.5 per cent of the world’s thefts take place against British holidaymakers, followed by Indonesia in fifth (7 per cent), Argentina in sixth (5.7 per cent), and the US in seventh position (5.3 per cent).

In eighth place is Brazil, where 4.5 per cent of claimed thefts took place, followed by Canada (ninth, 3.7 per cent) and Costa Rica (10th, 3.5 per cent).

The 10 countries where British holidaymakers are most likely to be victims of theft or robbery have been revealed – and it’s Spain that tops the ranking. Pictured is Barcelona

The 10 countries where British holidaymakers are most likely to be victims of theft or robbery have been revealed – and it’s Spain that tops the ranking. Pictured is Barcelona 

More than one in ten thefts and robberies against British tourists across the world took place in Spain (12.7 per cent) and Mexico (above, 10.3 per cent)

More than one in ten thefts and robberies against British tourists across the world took place in Spain (12.7 per cent) and Mexico (above, 10.3 per cent)

TOP 10 HOLIDAY DESTINATIONS WHERE BRITONS ARE MOST LIKELY TO FACE THEFT

 1. Spain

2. Mexico

3. Colombia

4. Peru

5. Indonesia 

6. Argentina

7. US

8. Brazil

9. Canada

10. Costa Rica 

 Source: True Traveller

True Traveller says its customers often travel ‘to more far-flung places than other insurers’, which suggests the stats offer a broader picture of the risks to British holidaymakers worldwide.

Theft and robbery were the most common crime-related claims made by British holidaymakers, making up almost a third (32 per cent) of lost luggage claims, with the rest being lost or broken items.

British tourists are most likely to be targeted at transport hubs while thefts from hotel rooms are rare, the data shows.

Tim Riley, managing director of True Traveller, said: ‘By far the highest places where the thefts take place are bus stations, railway stations or airports.

‘Thefts from hotel rooms, in comparison, are rare. Thefts from restaurants are actually higher from hotels. However, it should be noted that thefts from hotels may be lodged by customers as losses, and not thefts.

‘For bus stations, airports and so on, it’s simply the fact people put their day pack on the floor, and someone just comes along and steals it from behind them or causes a commotion elsewhere in the airport so people look away from their belongings.

‘As I get to see so many of these claims cases coming in, when I’m at an airport or waiting for a bus outside an airport to get to the car rental place, I’m convinced someone is going to steal my stuff so I’m very alert.’

In third place is Colombia, home to Tayrona National Park, pictured above

In third place is Colombia, home to Tayrona National Park, pictured above

Peru, home to Machu Picchu, pictured above, ranks fourth in the theft ranking

Peru, home to Machu Picchu, pictured above, ranks fourth in the theft ranking

The company has several tips to avoid falling victim to theft and robbery on holiday, such as ‘keeping a stash’ to spread the risk.

It says: ‘Keep one credit card and a £50 note hidden and separate from your main stash.

‘Sellotaping a credit card between two pages in a guidebook is an idea. Local thieves never steal guidebooks.’

Keeping cash and cards in a money belt can also help to prevent theft because ‘no one will be able to steal them without you knowing’, True Traveller says.

Other ways to reduce risk are carrying no more than £200 at any one time and using the hotel safe to store extra cash, cards and other valuables, it says, adding: ‘If there’s no safe in your room, there will be one in reception.’

To prevent your bag being snatched from under your nose in a restaurant or cafe, says True Traveller, put ‘a strap of your bag around your foot’.

Another technique is to avoid looking ‘lost or too flashy’ on holiday.

‘If you’re standing on a street corner looking at your shiny iPhone 13, with your new camera around your neck, looking lost, you’re being looked at,’ the insurance firm claims.

‘Do a bit of research before you go out, and be circumspect if you do get lost, and act appropriately.

‘Try to make this a habit, regardless of what country you’re travelling in.’

TOP TIPS TO AVOID HAVING YOUR BELONGINGS STOLEN ON HOLIDAY 

Keep a stash: Keep one credit card and a £50 note hidden and separate from your main stash. Sellotaping a credit card between two pages in a guidebook is an idea. Local thieves never steal guidebooks.

Money belts: When you’re travelling on trains, buses and so on, put your passport, cash and cards in your money belt. No one will be able to steal them without you knowing.

Cash: There is no point in carrying more than £200 or so of cash at any one time. Just use your card and get extra cash out of a cash machine.

Use the safe: If there’s no safe in your room, there will be one in reception. Use it, and put your cash, cards and passport inside it, and your camera and laptop as well if you’re not using them. Then just go out in the day with a small amount of cash and one credit card.

Stay Alert: In restaurants put your belongings under the table, but secure it – maybe put a strap of your bag around your foot.

Avoid looking lost or flashy: If you’re standing on a street corner looking at your shiny iPhone 13, with your new camera around your neck, looking lost, you’re being looked at. Do a bit of research before you go out, and be circumspect if you do get lost, and act appropriately. Try to make this a habit, regardless of what country you’re travelling in.

Source: True Traveller 



Read More

Leave a comment

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More