Kevin McCarthy ALREADY moves into Speaker’s office and insists ‘we will have a good day


House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy told reporters Tuesday would be a ‘good day’ after his staff spent Monday morning moving his office furniture into the Speaker’s chambers.

Looking somewhat stressed on Monday afternoon, the California Republican was rushing out of the US Capitol when reporters asked him about the following day’s House-wide vote to elect their chamber’s leader.

McCarthy’s campaign for the gavel has been somewhat bumpy for weeks, but the pressure has ramped up in the final 48 hours with as many as 15 GOP members allegedly ready to vote against him. He can only lose four votes to still clinch victory.

Earlier that day, his staff had been seen moving belongings and wheeling carts into the House Speaker’s office at the US Capitol. 

The move is standard protocol, according to CNN, but it means he’ll have to move back out if more than four House Republicans rebel against his cause – which is becoming an increasingly likely scenario.

A group of five Republicans leading the ‘Never Kevin’ movement appear to have inspired more to join their cause. One of them, Rep. Bob Good, told Fox & Friends on Monday that he expected between 10 and 15 people to vote against McCarthy.

He said the Republican leader is ‘part of the problem, not the solution.’

It’s a sentiment that’s been echoed by nine other House Republicans in a New Year’s Day letter.

House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy appeared somewhat harried when leaving the US Capitol on Monday afternoon

House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy appeared somewhat harried when leaving the US Capitol on Monday afternoon

Reporters were quizzing him on whether he is confident about Tuesday’s Speakership vote

Earlier, his staff was seen moving boxes into the Speaker's chambers

Earlier, his staff was seen moving boxes into the Speaker’s chambers

McCarthy told colleagues on Sunday that he was ready to make certain concessions to win support that he and moderates in the conference had been wary of for weeks. The most controversial among them is a motion to vacate the chair, which under the current proposed rules would allow any five House Republicans to call for a vote for a new Speaker.

But the nine current and incoming House Republicans signed onto a letter calling McCarthy’s announcement ‘almost impossibly late.’ 

But nevertheless, he told reporters in a video shared by NBC News’ Haley Talbot: ‘I think we will have a good day tomorrow.’ 

McCarthy needs 218 votes to win Speaker, meaning he can only afford to lose the support of four Republicans.

And in a dire sign for his campaign, even McCarthy’s supporters are re-upping talk of a Plan B.

Nebraska Republican Rep. Don Bacon, a moderate, wrote an op-ed in the Daily Caller on Monday calling McCarthy’s leadership ‘superb’ but reasserting that he was willing to work with Democrats for an alternative should the anti-McCarthy rebellion succeed. 

‘Much has been made of me saying I would work with moderate Democrats to elect a more moderate speaker,’ Bacon wrote.

‘But my actual words were that if the five refused to coalesce around what the vast majority of the conference wants, I’m willing to work across the aisle to find an agreeable Republican.’

Virginia Rep. Bob Good (right) told Fox & Friends that he expects up to 15 Republicans to vote against Kevin McCarthy's bid for House Speaker on Tuesday, claiming the current GOP Leader is a part of the 'swamp cartel'

Virginia Rep. Bob Good (right) told Fox & Friends that he expects up to 15 Republicans to vote against Kevin McCarthy’s bid for House Speaker on Tuesday, claiming the current GOP Leader is a part of the ‘swamp cartel’

In his Fox interview on Monday, Good said his constituents in Virginia’s 5th congressional district ‘told me not to support Kevin McCarthy’ for Speaker. 

He also claimed that while the group of 14 lawmakers who have already publicly said they won’t back McCarthy don’t necessarily have an alternative in mind – they just want to block him from taking over from outgoing Democratic Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

‘If it’s not Kevin, who would you vote for?’ Good was asked on Monday.

‘What we will do is block Kevin,’ he replied. ‘I suspect there will be 10 to 15 members who will vote against him on the first ballot tomorrow – that will vote for Andy Biggs.’

‘But then I think you will see on the second ballot an increasing number of members vote for a true candidate who can represent the conservative conference. Motivate the base,’ Good said.

He did not elaborate on who he believed would be the eventual winner. 

The House majority has only failed to elect a speaker on the first ballot once since the Civil War – and the last time it happened was exactly 100 years ago in 1923.

Support for Rep. Kevin McCarthy’s bid appears to be weakening in the GOP as 14 lawmakers have publicly said they oppose his run, a day ahead of the vote.

Nine current and incoming Republicans warned in a New Year's Day letter how electing McCarthy would be a 'continuation of Republican failures'

Nine current and incoming Republicans warned in a New Year’s Day letter how electing McCarthy would be a ‘continuation of Republican failures’

McCarthy has tried to garner some favor with those in the party against him by conceding to a demand that he lowers the threshold needed to remove a House speaker from their post.

A ‘motion to vacate the chair’ has only ever been used twice in U.S. history.  In practical terms, it’s akin to a vote of ‘no confidence’ in which members can submit a request for the current leader to step down.

The parliamentarian procedure was first invoked in 1910 against Republican Speaker Joseph Cannon and the second time was more than 100 years later in 2015 against Republican Speaker Mark Meadows – who later served as former President Donald Trump’s chief of staff.

The five original ‘Never Kevin’ lawmakers who rallied against McCarthy are Representatives Good, Biggs of Arizona, Matt Gaetz of Florida, Ralph Norman of South Carolina and Matt Rosendale of Montana.

The nine additional Republicans who pledged to vote against McCarthy in the Sunday letter are Representatives Scott Perry of Pennsylvania, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Chip Roy of Texas, Dan Bishop of North Carolina, Andy Harris of Maryland and Andrew Clyde of Georgia; along with Representative-elects Andy Ogales of Tennessee, Anna Paulina Luna of Florida and Eli Crane of Arizona.

Perry, who is Chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, posted the letter to his Twitter calling for change and a shake-up in leadership.

‘Nothing changes when nothing changes, and that must start from the top,’ Perry wrote. ‘Time to make the change or get out of the way.’

Good slammed McCarthy for allowing massive omnibus spending bills to pass the House before breaking for the holidays.

McCarthy released a New Year's Eve letter entitled 'Restoring the People's House and Ending Business as Usual,' where he admitted the dysfunction of the House and pledged to make it right

McCarthy released a New Year’s Eve letter entitled ‘Restoring the People’s House and Ending Business as Usual,’ where he admitted the dysfunction of the House and pledged to make it right

‘There is nothing that indicates to me that he is going to change his pattern since he has been in leadership where he is part of the swamp cartel,’ the Virginia Republican said. ‘He is the reason on the Republican side why we pass massive omnibus spending bills that just got rammed down our throats by Republicans in the Senate. He was part of that in leadership.’

The ‘swamp cartel’ reference stems from Trump, who dubbed Washington, D.C. a ‘swamp’ in his 2016 presidential campaign and said he was going to go to the nation’s capital to ‘drain the swamp’. 

‘There is nothing about Kevin McCarthy that indicates he will bring the change that’s needed to Washington or that’s needed in the Congress, or he will bring the fight against Biden-Schumer agenda and represent the interest of the voters who sent us to Washington to bring us real change.’

On Sunday, McCarthy held a private conference call with Republicans in an attempt to garner support for his speakership vote on Tuesday, January 3, which is when the new Congress takes office.

‘For someone with a 14-year presence in senior House Republican leadership, Mr. McCarthy bears squarely the burden to correct the dysfunction he now explicitly admits across that long tenure,’ the nine GOP members wrote in their letter.

They added that his ‘statement comes almost impossibly late to address continued deficiencies ahead of the opening of the 118th Congress on January 3rd.’

‘At this state, it cannot be a surprise that expressions of vague hopes reflected in far too many of the crucial points still under debate are insufficient. This is especially true with respect to Mr. McCarthy’s candidacy for speaker because the times call for radical departure from the status quo – not a continuation of past and ongoing, Republican failures,’ the letter stated. 





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