Ten VERY odd room service orders made in hotels around the world


Revealed: Ten VERY odd room service orders made in hotels around the world, from the USA to Japan via the UK

Life in the hospitality industry is notoriously tough. And some guests don’t help – especially the ones who leave staff scratching their heads with odd room service requests.

Such as diet water. 

When hundreds of hotels around the world were asked by researchers for their most bizarre room service requests for a global study, this impossible drink was flagged as a room service order by a hotel in the U.S. 

In total, 473 hotels worldwide took part in the survey, by Hotels.com, which also revealed that properties had been asked for ‘bison meat’ and an egg-less version of an egg dish called shakshuka.

The typical North African dish consists of poached eggs in a simmering tomato sauce with spices, meaning the guest was presumably left with not much more than tomatoes on their plate. 

Hundreds of hotels around the world were asked by researchers for their most bizarre room service requests (stock image)

Hundreds of hotels around the world were asked by researchers for their most bizarre room service requests (stock image)

One guest showed up at their hotel with a raw fish and asked kitchen staff to cook it for them (stock image)

One guest showed up at their hotel with a raw fish and asked kitchen staff to cook it for them (stock image)

A study revealed how one hotel guest asked for an egg-based shakshuka, above, without the eggs (stock image)

A study revealed how one hotel guest asked for an egg-based shakshuka, above, without the eggs (stock image)

10 BIZARRE ROOM SERVICE ORDERS 

Diet water, requested by a hotel guest in the US.

Melted ice cream, requested by a hotel guest in Japan.

Blowfish, requested by a hotel guest in the U.S.

Boiled bottled water, requested by a hotel guest in the U.S.

A guest in South Korea brought their own fish to a hotel and asked staff to cook it. 

‘Cockle popcorn’ – or deep-fried cockles – from a hotel guest in the UK.

A rice bowl for dogs, requested by a hotel guest in France.

Bison meat, requested by a guest at a hotel in the U.S.

Shakshuka – a dish consisting of poached eggs in a tomato sauce – without the eggs, requested by a hotel guest in South Korea.

A no-egg-white omelette, requested by a hotel guest in the U.S. 

Another U.S guest asked for ‘boiled bottled water’, while one in South Korea showed up at their hotel with a raw fish and asked staff to cook it.

Other odd requests from the Hotels.com survey included ‘melted ice cream’, ‘cockle popcorn’ – or deep-fried cockles, a ‘no-egg-white omelette’, a blowfish, and a ‘rice bowl for dogs’.

Results from the study also revealed ‘what’s in when it comes to dining in’ – a far more conventional list.

The most popular order worldwide was a burger (40 per cent), beating the classic club sandwich, pizza, and even chips.

For Brits, it’s all about burgers in bed, with the most popular time for room service being between 7pm and 8pm,’ the study said.

‘While it’s all about escargot and oysters in public, burgers and chips rule in the room, with 75 per cent of hotels saying that people order fancier food in the hotel restaurant.’

British food orders are evolving year on year, with more than half (55 per cent) of hotels seeing an increase in vegan orders over the past year, a higher proportion of properties seeing an increase in requests for vegetarian or dairy-free dishes. 

The inaugural study – named the Room Service Report – further found that demand for room service is on the rise globally, according to almost two in five hotels, and almost a third (30 per cent) of travellers spend at least £100 on their room service bill per night.

Melanie Fish, spokesperson for Hotels.com, said: ‘Room service holds a special place in the hearts of hotel guests.

‘Whether it’s a treat-yourself moment or must-have after a long day of sightseeing.’

The study looked at global room service trends from April 5 to 23, 2023, across hotels currently offering in-room dining in the U.S, UK, France, Canada, Mexico, South Korea, Japan, Norway, Sweden and Denmark. 

Hotels.com is encouraging travellers to make the most of room service during their next stay and will be giving 100 guests up to £100 to spend on their ‘unusual requests’. Enter at Hotels.com/roomservice

TOP HOTELS WITH OUT-OF-THE-ORDINARY ROOM SERVICE 

The Milestone Hotel, London, UK: Treat yourself to a private in-room concert from the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra while having your room service meal. Suites from £1,165 per night. Orchestra is quoted on an individual basis.

The Milestone Hotel & Residences in Kensington (above), where guests can have an orchestra on room service

The Milestone Hotel & Residences in Kensington (above), where guests can have an orchestra on room service

InterContinental Bora Bora Resort and Thalasso Spa, Bora Bora, French Polynesia: Here, it’s not just about what is being delivered to your door… it’s about how it’s being delivered. Request an exquisite meal for two to be delivered to the deck of your overwater villa in a traditional outrigger canoe. Villas from £1,400 per night.

Post Oak Hotel, Houston, United States: In celebration of the most ordered room service item — the mighty burger — why not try out the ultimate hotel burger. This hotel serves ‘The Black Gold Burger’, which includes 16 ounces of wagyu beef, seared foie gras and black truffle in a caviar-infused black-and-24K-gold brioche bun, which will set you back a whopping $1,600 (£1,290). Rooms from £507 per night.

Ashford Castle, Co. Mayo, Ireland: Room service isn’t just for grown-ups at Ashford Castle. Guests can request a Lego butler where younger travellers can pick from a selection of sets and the butler will bring it to your room on a silver tray. Rooms from £706 (€820) per night with a £34 (€40) fee for the Lego butler.

The Plaza Hotel, New York, United States: This hotel is home to one of the most famous room service orders – the Home Alone sundae featuring a whooping 16 scoops of ice cream and layers of toppings for $300 (£240). Rooms from £789 per night.

Source: Hotels.com. 



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