Premier League’s money rankings revealed as relegated clubs all earn over £100m


It’s not all doom and gloom! Premier League’s relegated clubs all bank over £100m each from TV deals, commercial fees and prize money as the top-flight’s money rankings are revealed

  • Leeds, Leicester and Southampton all earned over £100million this season 
  • The money table combines the TV deals, commercial fees and prize money
  • Here, Mail Sport has taken a look at the fascinating standings in more detail 

The three clubs relegated from the Premier League this season may be set for bleak summers, but the money earned from the top-flight will certainly soften the blow.

Leicester and Leeds were both consigned to the Championship on the dramatic final day of the season, with Everton narrowly surviving after beating Bournemouth

Southampton, meanwhile, played out a thrilling draw with Liverpool in their finale ahead of a period of upheaval, albeit in the knowledge they were already down.

Each of the sides will likely be forced into selling a host of players and making swingeing cuts, although parachute payments will cushion the impact somewhat.

Their coffers will also have been topped up by a combination of their earnings from TV money and commercial fees, as shown in last campaign’s money league.

Leeds were relegated to the Championship but made over £100m in the money league

Leeds were relegated to the Championship but made over £100m in the money league

Leicester also dropped out of the Premier League but their earnings will cushion the fall

Leicester also dropped out of the Premier League but their earnings will cushion the fall

Southampton were the first club consigned to the second tier near the end of a lucrative year

Southampton were the first club consigned to the second tier near the end of a lucrative year

Simply, even finishing at the very bottom of the table is highly lucrative.

Every Premier League club is given £87.5million as standard from domestic TV (£31.8m), foreign TV (£48.9m) and commercial fees (£6.8m).

With facility fees also brought into the mix as well as domestic and European prize money, the money standings make for intriguing reading.

Basement outfit Southampton earned a total of £102.5m, while Leeds, who finished 19th after their defeat by Tottenham, made £110.2m.

Above them, Leicester took home £111.2m despite tumbling through the trap door. 

At the other end of the table, Manchester City, who were crowned champions once again after Arsenal’s late collapse, banked an eye-watering £165.7m.

Champions Manchester City also topped the money table, narrowly ahead of Arsenal

Champions Manchester City also topped the money table, narrowly ahead of Arsenal

Manchester United finished third in both leagues after a superb first season under Erik ten Hag

Manchester United finished third in both leagues after a superb first season under Erik ten Hag

Tottenham took sixth place in the money league despite missing out on Europe in reality

Tottenham took sixth place in the money league despite missing out on Europe in reality

Mikel Arteta’s outfit secured £162.2m altogether, placing them ahead of third-placed Manchester United and their final tally of £158.6m.

Unsurprisingly, Newcastle took fourth spot in both the actual Premier League standings and the money league thanks to their £156.8m figure.

Further down the rankings, it was revealed that Tottenham had taken sixth despite their eighth-placed finish in reality, one that saw them miss out on European football.

Despite the successes of Brighton and Aston Villa this campaign, Spurs were able to better their kitties. The struggling north Londoners boasted £145.1m in comparison to the £142.1m and £141.2m of the Seagulls and Villa respectively.

As for crisis-stricken Chelsea, they finished ninth in the money league courtesy of their £133.4m payday, despite them ending a nightmarish season in 12th.





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